Category Templates

Introduction

When a viewer clicks on a link to one of the Categories on your site, he or she is taken to a page listing the Posts in that particular Category in chronological order, from newest Posts at the top to oldest at the bottom. There are many display choices, including whether to display the complete post or post excerpts, and what additional information to display (title, author, publish date, last modified time, etc.). Each theme makes different choices, and you might want to change them.

This article explains how to change what happens when the blog viewer is visiting one of your site’s Category pages. This involves the use of Themes and Template files, so if you are new to template files, you might want to read Using Themes and Stepping Into Templates first.

Permalinks to category archives are controlled by Using Permalinks settings.

What Template File is Used?
The first step in modifying what happens when someone visits a Category page is to figure out which of your theme’s files is going to be used to display the posts. This is known as the Template Hierarchy.

In the case of categories, the hierarchy is fairly simple. For instance, suppose the slug of the Category in question is news and the Category ID is 6. The Template Hierarchy specifies that WordPress will use the first Template file it finds in your current Theme’s directory from the following list:

category-slug.php
category-ID.php
category.php
archive.php
index.php
That is, if you do not have a category-slug.php (lets say category-news.php), WordPress will check for a category-ID.php (like category-6.php), and so on.

So, if you want to make the Category whose ID number is 6 look different from what it is currently (and different from other Category pages), you would want to create a category-6.php file. If you want to make all Category pages look different from other archive pages (such as date and author archives), then you would want to create or modify the category.php file. If you want to make changes to the look of all archive pages, you can create or modify the archive.php file. And if you modify the index.php file, you will affect your entire blog.

If you need to create a new file, it is a good idea to copy it from the next file in the hierarchy that exists. For instance, if you want a special display for Category 6, begin by copying the category.php file, or if you don’t have one, use archive.php, and so on.

Examples

Now that you’ve figured out which template file in your theme’s directory you need to modify, in order to make changes to the look of Category pages, let’s look at some examples. In these examples, when it says “edit your template file”, it means to edit the file you chose in the section above.

https://codex.wordpress.org/Category_Templates

PHP, Wordpress